Posted by: Michael D. Austin | September 26, 2009

DR. EMILY MONOSSON, NEIGHBORHOOD TOXICOLOGIST

Dr. Emily Monosson, Neighborhood Toxicologist

Dr. Emily Monosson, Neighborhood Toxicologist

On Monday, 9-28-09 at 8:00 AM Pacific time, Blue Planet Almanac will feature “Neighborhood Toxicologist” Emily Monosson, Ph.D. at HealthyLife.net. Listeners will point their Internet browser to HealthyLife.net and click, “Listen Live.” Emily is a wife and mother of two children ages 12 and 15, in the midst of authoring her forthcoming book, The Neighborhood Toxicologist and her articles have appeared in noteworthy publications such as the Los Angeles Times.

Emily will speak to Blue Planet Almanac listeners about examples of the many chemical decisions they make daily in their lives, what chemicals or products might be safe and which are not. Although she tends to be modest, Emily sports a broad knowledge of a variety of chemical fields including nanotechnology, endocrine disruptors and pesticides.

For the past fifteen years Emily has worked as an independent toxicologist consulting for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the nonprofit environmental advocates of Conservation Law Foundation Ventures, the for-profit environmental consultants of The Cadmus Group, Inc. and citizens’ groups. On topics ranging from PCBs to nanoparticles to aquatic herbicides, a large portion of Emily’s work involves explaining current toxicological research to a diverse audience.  As Associate Editor, author and member of the Advisory Board for the award winning online Encyclopedia of Earth, Emily is also an active board member for the Montague Reporter.

Emily developed her accessible “The Neighborhood Toxicologist” blog so her audience is better prepared to make their own decisions about which products to avoid or eliminate from their lives. At The Neighborhood Toxicologist Emily has discussed antibacterial soaps, sunscreens, clothing, toxic toys, PCBs, pesticides, endocrine disrupting chemicals, plastics, recycling, electronic waste, nanotoxicology and chemical mixtures. The Neighborhood Toxicologist also appears in a monthly column for the weekly Montague Reporter and articles have been reprinted in the Green Living Journal and in Oceans Magazine.

This past year Emily edited the book, Motherhood, the Elephant in the Laboratory: Women Scientists Speak Out, which was published by Cornell University Press, and American Scientist reviewed the book. “Motherhood” has lead to many panels and discussion focused on women, science and changing attitudes about careers. Monosson also co-edited Interconnections between Human and Ecosystem Health published by Chapman and Hall, bridging the gap between traditionally human-oriented sciences and environmental sciences.

Fairy Tern, McKean Island in the Phoenix chain

Fairy Tern, McKean Island in the Phoenix chain

Educated at Cornell, Emily’s research experience also includes positions at the U.S. EPA Marine Research Laboratory in Narragansett, Rhode Island; the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts; and the U.S. EPA Health Effects Research Laboratory in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. For over a decade Monosson has held an adjunct faculty position in the Department of Natural Resource and Conservation at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and visiting faculty positions at Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts, where she has introduced students to the science of environmental contaminants through community projects and through writing.

Blue Planet Almanac radio airs live with host Mike Austin on HealthyLife.net on the 4th Monday of each month at 8:00 A.M. Pacific Time. Blue Planet Almanac is also re-broadcast later in the week and shows are archived three days after airtime at that same site, with some available through this link. HealthyLife.net is an all-positive talk station and has over 3 million listeners monthly in 104 countries and all 50 United States.

Blue Planet Almanac – good choices for Earthlings. Join us today!


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